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Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

Here is the Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

10. Suicide (intentional self-harm)

Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

Deaths: 41,149
Males: 32,055
Females: 9,094
Rate: 13.0
Age-adjusted rate: 12.6
Percentage of total deaths: 1.58%.
According to the CDC, suicide results in an estimated $34.6 billion loss in combined medical and work costs.39
Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the US with around 41,149 deaths each year.

  • An estimated 8.3 million adults (3.7% of the adult US population) reported having suicidal thoughts in the past year
  • Estimated 2.2 million adults (1.0% of the adult US population) reported having made suicide plans in the past year
  • Estimated 1 million adults (0.5% of the US adult population) reported making a suicide attempt in the past year.
  • There is one suicide for every 25 attempted suicides
  • Among young adults aged 15 to 24 years old, there are approximately 100-200 attempts for every completed suicide
  • In 2011, 487,700 people were treated in emergency departments for self-inflicted injuries
  • In 2013, 18,241 men, and 2,934 women died as a result of suicide by firearm
  • Nonfatal, self-inflicted injuries result in an estimated $6.5 billion loss in combined medical and work costs.
  • According to the CDC, suicide results in an estimated $34.6 billion loss in combined medical and work costs

9: Kidney disease (nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and nephrosis)

Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

Deaths: 47,112
Males: 23,493
Females: 23,619
Rate: 14.9
Age-adjusted rate: 13.2
Percentage of total deaths: 1.81%.

  • Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and nephrosis are all conditions, disorders or diseases of the kidneys.
  • Kidney disease is the ninth leading cause of death in the US with around 47,112 deaths each year.
  • Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a condition in which the kidneys are damaged and cannot filter blood as well as healthy kidneys.
  • Because of this, waste from the blood remains in the body and may cause other health problems.35
  • An estimated 10% of adults in the US – more than 20 million people – are thought to have CKD to some degree.
  • The chances of developing CKD increase with age, especially after the age of 50, and the condition is most common among adults older than 70 years.
  • Chronic kidney disease is widespread and costly, costing Medicare upward of $41 billion annually

 

8: Influenza and pneumonia

Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

Deaths: 56,979
Males: 26,804
Females: 30,175
Rate: 18
Age-adjusted rate: 15.9
Percentage of total deaths: 2.19%.
Influenza accounts for 3,697 deaths annually and pneumonia 53,282.

 

  • Influenza (flu) is a highly contagious viral infection that is one of the most severe illnesses of the winter season.
  • The reason influenza is more prevalent in the winter is not known; however, data suggest the virus survives and is transmitted better in cold temperatures.
  • Influenza is spread easily from person to person, usually when an infected person coughs or sneezes

 

 

7: Diabetes (diabetes mellitus)

Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

Deaths: 75,578
Males: 39,841
Females: 35,737
Rate: 23.9
Age-adjusted rate: 21.2
Percentage of total deaths: 2.91%.

  • Diabetes mellitus is a disease in which the body is no longer able to carefully control blood glucose, leading to abnormally high levels of blood glucose (hyperglycemia).
  • Persistently elevated blood glucose can cause damage to the body’s tissues, including the nerves, blood vessels, and tissues in the eyes.
  • Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose, a simple sugar, for our bodies to use for energy.
  • The pancreas, an organ situated near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin that helps glucose get into the cells of our bodies.
  • When a person has diabetes, the body either does not make enough insulin or cannot use insulin as well as it should. This causes sugar to build up in the blood.

 

6: Alzheimer’s disease

Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

Deaths: 84,767
Males: 25,836
Females: 58,931
Rate: 26.8
Age-adjusted rate: 23.5
Percentage of total deaths: 3.26%.

  • Dementia is an overall term for diseases and conditions characterized by a decline in memory or other cognitive abilities that affects a person’s ability to perform everyday activities.
  • Dementia is caused by damage to nerve cells in the brain which are called neurons.
  • As a result of the damage, neurons can no longer function normally and may die. This, in turn, can lead to changes in memory, behavior and the ability to think clearly.
  • Alzheimer’s is the sixth leading cause of death in the US with around 84,767 deaths each year.
  • It is just one type of dementia, with vascular dementia causing similar symptoms but resulting from changes to the blood vessels that supply circulation to the brain.
  • For people with Alzheimer’s disease, the damage and death of neurons eventually impair the ability to carry out basic bodily functions such as walking and swallowing

5: Stroke (cerebrovascular diseases)

Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

Deaths: 128,978
Males: 53,691
Females: 75,287
Rate: 40.8
Age-adjusted rate: 36.2
Percentage of total deaths: 4.97%

  • Every year more than 795,000 people in the US have a stroke; risk of having a stroke varies with race, ethnicity, age and geography.
  • Risk of stroke increases with age, yet in 2009 34% of people hospitalized for stroke were younger than 65 years.
  • The highest death rates from stroke in the US occur in the southeast.

4: Accidents (unintentional injuries)

Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

Deaths: 130,557
Males: 81,916
Females: 48,641
Rate: 41.3
Age-adjusted rate: 39.4
Percentage of total deaths: 5.02%.

  • Accidents, also referred to as unintentional injuries, are at present the 4th leading cause of death in the US and the leading cause of death for those between the ages 1 to 44.
  • The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration say that highway crashes alone have an annual price tag of around $871 billion in economic loss and social harm, with speeding accounting for $210 billion of that figure.

 

3: Chronic lower respiratory disease

Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

Deaths: 149,205
Males: 70,317
Females: 78,888
Rate: 47.2
Age-adjusted rate: 42.1
Percentage of total deaths: 5.74%.

  • Chronic lower respiratory disease (CLRD) is a collection of lung diseases that cause airflow blockage and breathing-related issues, including primarily chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but also bronchitis, emphysema and asthma

 

2: Cancer (malignant neoplasms)

Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

Deaths: 584,881
Males: 307,559
Females: 277,322
Rate: 185
Age-adjusted rate: 163.2
Percentage of total deaths: 22.52%.

  • Cancer affects people of all genders, ages, races and ethnicities.
  •  The National Institutes of Health (NIH) estimate the total costs of cancer in 2009 were $216.6 billion: $86.6 billion for direct medical costs and $130.0 billion for indirect mortality costs.

 

1: Heart disease

Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

Top 10 leading causes of death in the US

Deaths: 611,105
Males: 321,347
Females: 289,758
Rate: 193.3
Age-adjusted rate: 169.8
Percentage of total deaths: 23.53%.
Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the US and also the leading cause of death worldwide. More than half of the deaths that occur as a result of heart disease are in men

 

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